Fishing in Thailand

Fishing in Thailand

 

Traditionally, many different kinds of boats have been used as fishing boats to catch fish in the sea, or on a lake or river. Even today, many traditional fishing boats are still in use. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization(FAO), at the end of 2004, the world fishing fleet consisted of about 4 million vessels, of which 2.7 million were undecked (open) boats. While nearly all decked vessels were mechanised, only one-third of the undecked fishing boats were powered, usually with outboard engines. The remaining 1.8 million boats were traditional craft of various types, operated by sail and oars.

There are many fishing techniques or methods for catching fish. The term can also be applied to methods for catching otheraquatic animals such as molluscs ( shellfish, squid, octopus) and edible marine invertebrates.

Fishing techniques include hand gathering, spearfishing, netting, angling and trapping. Recreational, commercial andartisanal fishers use different techniques, and also, sometimes, the same techniques. Recreational fishers fish for pleasure or sport, while commercial fishers fish for profit. Artisanal fishers use traditional, low-tech methods, for survival in third-world countries, and as a cultural heritage in other countries. Mostly, recreational fishers use angling methods and commercial fishers use netting methods.

There is an intricate link between various fishing techniques and knowledge about the fish and their behaviour includingmigration, foraging and habitat. The effective use of fishing techniques often depends on this additional knowledge. Some fishermen follow fishing folklores which claim that fish feeding patterns are influenced by the position of the sun and the moon.

Advertisements
Posted in Thailand. Comments Off on Fishing in Thailand

Wan Khao Phansa 2015

Wan Khao Phansa 2015

Buddha Wat Sothon Chachongsao

Wan Asana Bucha 2015 – วันอาสาฬหบูชา/Wan Khao Phansa 2015

  • Full moon of the eighth lunar month (usually in July). Friday, 11 July 2014.
  • Tuesday, 30 June 2015

The day before Wan Khao Pansa 2015 is known as Asanha Puja (วันอาสาฬหบูชา) Wan Asana Bucha in Thai (pronounced wan ah sa ha boo cha). This commemorates the Buddha’s first sermon in the Deer Park at Benares (Varanasi) in India. In this sermon, known as Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion, the Buddha first spelled out the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path. This day is also regarded as the founding day of the Buddhist sangha (monkhood).

Many Thai people will return to their ancestral homes to worship in their local temple and to bring offerings for the monks. In the evening they will often perform a wian tian, where they walk clockwise around the main shrine of the temple carrying a candle, three incense sticks and a lotus bed. During the day, monks chant mantras or repeat the first sermon of the Buddha.

Wan Khao Phansa 2015

  • First day after the full moon of the eighth lunar month (usually in July). Saturday, 12 July 2014.
  • Wednesday, 01 July 2015

Wan Khao Pansa (วันเข้าพรรษา) means the day of entering the rains retreat. This is a three-month annual retreat usually undertaken from July to October, during which monks must stay at the same temple, and refrain from wandering around the countryside. In India, it is known as Vassa. It begins on the day after Asana Bucha. The tradition dates from the time of the Buddha, when he forbade monks to travel during the rainy season for fear that they might unintentionally harm crops or insects in the places where they walked. This is also known as Buddhist lent and many Thai people take it upon themselves to abstain from Alcohol and tobacco.

Read more here

Posted in Thailand. Comments Off on Wan Khao Phansa 2015

Asarnha Bucha Day Thailand

Asarnha Bucha Day Thailand

Asalha Puja festival Thailand

Interest

Asalha Puja (known as Asanha Bucha in Thailand, Thai: อาสาฬหบูชา) is a Theravada Buddhist festival which typically takes place in July, on the full moon of the eighth lunar month. Asalha Puja, also known as Dharma Day, is one of Theravada Buddhism’s most important festivals, celebrating as it does the Buddha’s first sermon in which he set out to his five former associates the doctrine that had come to him following his enlightenment. This first pivotal sermon, often referred to as “setting into motion the wheel of dharma,” is the teaching which is encapsulated for Buddhists in the four noble truths: there is suffering (dukkha); suffering is caused by craving (tanha); there is a state (nirvana) beyond suffering and craving; and finally, the way to nirvana is via the eightfold path. All the various schools and traditions of Buddhism revolve around the central doctrine of the four noble truths.

This first sermon is not only the first structured discourse given by the Buddha after his enlightenment, it also contains the essence of all his subsequent teaching. At the end of the talk, one of the five participants recounted his understanding of what had been said and asked to be received as a disciple, a request the Buddha granted, thus establishing the first order of monks.

It takes place on July 30 in Thailand, according to the (Thai lunar calendar)

The day is observed by donating offerings to temples and listening tosermons. The following day is known in Thailand as Thai: วันเข้าพรรษาWan Khao Phansa; it is the first day of Thai: พรรษา vassa, the Theravada rains retreat.

Posted in Thailand. Comments Off on Asarnha Bucha Day Thailand

Bang Saray Thailand

Bang Saray Thailand

Bang Saray Thailand. Until recently Bang Saray was a sleepy fishing village where the only activity was the coming and going of the small wooden fishing craft as they depart each day to make their catch.

Recently, due to the superb location it has been “slightly” developed by one or two high end villa projects. However, it still maintains its “olde worlde charm”. The gentle sloping beach and the calm turquoise waters are rarely busy and offer an excellent opportunity for relaxing and eating local barbecue and seafood dishes.

The community

Bang Saray (sometimes spelled Sere) is a small but growing village built around its fishing pier and safe harbour. While naturally the main population is Thai the remainder is made up of mostly European nationalities including Norwegian, Dutch, British, Irish, French, Italian and some Australians. This is reflected by most nationalities occupying a bar or restaurant in the village.

All in all it is a very laid back community consisting of fishermen going out to sea in the late evening as the sun goes down, and expats lazing on the beach if not golfing or indulging in watersports can be seen breezing along on that long sought after motorbike going nowhere special. While daytime is quite hot if not shaded under the many palms, the sun goes down about 18.30hrs. The locals are extremely friendly and operate their food, fruit and fish stalls on the kerbside or local market area which is normally held in the Temple grounds.

There are two Temples (Wats) in the village and as all over Thailand Temples are constructed soley from local donations the splendour and size of the Bang Saray Temples display alot of wealth in this particular area. Bang Saray is only 10 kilometers from Sattahip which is the largest Naval base in Thailand. The Navy on a weekly basis send about 100 recruits to the Village to carry out cleaning projects in the area such as Klongs (waterways) and the local beaches.

Thus the entire beach areas are spotless and the food vendors seen daily on the beach follow the example set by the Navy. During my time here I have met the only two policemen assigned to the area. Their busiest time each year is when they go around to sell tickets for the local football club or scout hall.

 

 

Posted in pattaya, Thailand. Comments Off on Bang Saray Thailand

Bang Saray Pattaya pano

 

Bang Saray Pattaya pano

Until recently Bang Saray was a sleepy fishing village where the only activity was the coming and going of the small wooden fishing craft as they depart each day to make their catch.

Recently, due to the superb location it has been “slightly” developed by one or two high end villa projects. However, it still maintains its “olde worlde charm”. The gentle sloping beach and the calm turquoise waters are rarely busy and offer an excellent opportunity for relaxing and eating local barbecue and seafood dishes.

Bang Saray Temple (Wat)

Only a couple of hundred metres in from the beach road stands the impressive Bang Saray Temple (Wat) with its tall roofs and highly decorated spires. If you are an early riser it is possible to see the monks on their daily rounds, collecting food and performing ritual blessings to the people.

The community

Bang Saray (sometimes spelled Sere) is a small but growing village built around its fishing pier and safe harbour. While naturally the main population is Thai the remainder is made up of mostly European nationalities including Norwegian, Dutch, British, Irish, French, Italian and some Australians. This is reflected by most nationalities occupying a bar or restaurant in the village.

All in all it is a very laid back community consisting of fishermen going out to sea in the late evening as the sun goes down, and expats lazing on the beach if not golfing or indulging in watersports can be seen breezing along on that long sought after motorbike going nowhere special. While daytime is quite hot if not shaded under the many palms, the sun goes down about 18.30hrs. The locals are extremely friendly and operate their food, fruit and fish stalls on the kerbside or local market area which is normally held in the Temple grounds.

There are two Temples (Wats) in the village and as all over Thailand Temples are constructed soley from local donations the splendour and size of the Bang Saray Temples display alot of wealth in this particular area. Bang Saray is only 10 kilometers from Sattahip which is the largest Naval base in Thailand. The Navy on a weekly basis send about 100 recruits to the Village to carry out cleaning projects in the area such as Klongs (waterways) and the local beaches.

Thus the entire beach areas are spotless and the food vendors seen daily on the beach follow the example set by the Navy. During my time here I have met the only two policemen assigned to the area. Their busiest time each year is when they go around to sell tickets for the local football club or scout hall.

 

 

 

 

Posted in pattaya, Thailand. Comments Off on Bang Saray Pattaya pano

via Facebook The Suns going down. http://ift.tt/1MUlh52

Posted in Thailand, Thailand Travel. Tags: , . Comments Off on via Facebook The Suns going down. http://ift.tt/1MUlh52

via Facebook The Suns going down. http://ift.tt/1MUlh52 via Facebook The Suns going down. http://ift.tt/1MUlh52

via Facebook http://ift.tt/1glIljh via Facebook The Suns going down.

http://ift.tt/1MUlh52

Posted in Richard Barton. Tags: . Comments Off on via Facebook The Suns going down. http://ift.tt/1MUlh52 via Facebook The Suns going down. http://ift.tt/1MUlh52
%d bloggers like this: